‘Memphis’ Musical Comes To Trustus Theatre

Fall in love with the intoxicating rhythm of the rock ‘n’ roll of the ‘50s

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Trustus Theatre brings the Tony Award-winning hit musical, Memphis by Joe Dipietro and David Bryan, to the Thigpen Main Stage this summer. Showing from June 29 – July 28, 2018, this show brings two unlikely characters together on Beale Street, although the world isn’t quite ready for their love or their rock ‘n’ roll music. Memphis will open on Friday, June 29 and will run through Saturday, July 28, 2018. Tickets may be purchased at www.trustus.org, or by calling the Trustus Box Office at 803-254-9732.

Set in the smoky halls and underground clubs of the segregated 1950s, this show tells the story of a young white DJ named Huey Calhoun who fell in love with rock ‘n’ roll and an electrifying black singer, Felicia Farrell. Memphis is an original story about the cultural revolution that erupted when his vision met her voice, and the music changed forever. This award-winning musical about the birth of rock ‘n’ roll will thrill you, move you, and have you dancing in the aisles!

Memphis’s book and lyrics were written by Joe Dipietro and the music and lyrics were written by David Bryan. It was the winner of the 2010 Tony for Best Musical and the winner of the 2010 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Musical. Memphis will be directed on Trustus Theatre’s Main Stage by Trustus Company Member Dewey Scott Wiley and will have music direction provided by Christopher Cockrell.

Sebastian Sowell will be bringing one of the main characters, Felicia Farrell, to life.

“It’s a story that includes themes very true to today like acceptance, tolerance, and love in a time of division, hate, and intolerance,” said Sowell. This story shows that one doesn’t always have to follow tradition, and even though change can be hard to understand, it can lead to a better future. Memphis takes place in a time where everything was so divided, but Felicia and Huey are an example of the acceptance and love that comes from not letting outside characteristics keep one from seeing the good characteristics inside of someone.”

“The subject matter for this show and the era in which it’s set isn’t the easiest to discuss,” said Jamie Meador, who will play Huey Calhoun. “But the fact that Memphis is a musical that helps bridge that gap. Scientists say mathematics is the universal language, but I say that music is. A good song is a good song despite your background, race, gender, or orientation. As I see it, our production’s subject matter mixed with songs gives everyone a commonality, a safe way to continue the conversation about diversity in all its forms. I wish it didn’t sound strange to say, but my favorite thing about being a part of Memphis is the diversity of the cast. In past theatre experiences—before moving to Columbia—finding African Americans to fill roles was difficult. I think it’s a testament not only to Trustus, but to Columbia’s arts scene, that everyone feels welcomed, their skills and talents are encouraged, and that there are opportunities to perform.”

Memphis will run from Friday, June 29 through to Saturday, July 28, 2018 and tickets are on sale now. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Trustus Theatre Box Office at 803-254-9732 or online at trustus.org. Tickets are $30 each for Thursday and Sunday shows and $35 for Friday and Saturday shows. Student tickets are $25 each. Opening night is Friday, June 29 at 8pm. The performances following are on Saturday, June 30, at 8pm; Thursday, July 5, at 7:30pm; Friday, July 6, at 8pm; Saturday, July 7, at 8pm; Sunday, July 8, at 3pm; Thursday, July 12, at 7:30pm; Friday, July 13, at 8pm; Saturday, July 14, at 8pm; Sunday, July 15, at 3pm; Thursday, July 19, at 7:30pm; Friday, July 20, at 8pm; Saturday, July 21, at 8pm; Sunday, July 22, at 3pm; Thursday, July 26, at 7:30pm; Friday, July 27, at 8pm; and Saturday, July 28, at 8pm.

A Talk-Back with cast and panelists will follow the performance on Sunday, July 22, 2018. The Memphis Band is sponsored by Gillian and Helmut Albrecht.